Appalachian Trail Conservancy Receives Grant from Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources to Continue South Mountain Partnership

Date Published: Jan 22, 2014

Boiling Springs, PA (January 22, 2014) – A grant from the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (DCNR) will enable the Appalachian Trail Conservancy to continue to advance conservation within south-central Pennsylvania through the direction of the South Mountain Partnership.

“As a model for landscape-scale conservation, we see the South Mountain Partnership as a vehicle to engage a diverse, inclusive coalition in conversation around the future of this special and unique landscape,” said Karen Lutz, regional director of the ATC’s Mid-Atlantic Regional Office in Boiling Springs, PA. “The Appalachian Trail Conservancy is thrilled to receive the continued support from DCNR on the implementation of this vision.”

With the grant of $195,000, the ATC will continue to support a full-time staff position to lead the Partnership as it implements a work plan designed to protect and promote the natural, cultural and recreational resources of the South Mountain landscape, a region that covers portions of Adams, Cumberland, Franklin and York Counties. The funding will also help support a competitive Mini-Grant Program which will enable eligible local partner organizations to receive Mini-Grants to support a variety of projects on the ground.

DCNR is the primary source of state support for Pennsylvania recreation, parks and conservation initiatives. Grant funding from DCNR assists hundreds of communities and organizations across Pennsylvania to plan, acquire, and develop recreation and park facilities, create trails and conserve open space.

“Pennsylvania’s parks and trails, natural areas and many opportunities to be active outdoors, on land and on our great rivers and streams define our communities and make them places where people want to live, work and play,” DCNR Secretary Ellen Ferretti said. “Our grants help our local partners meet the vision they have for their communities and regions.”

Funding for this grant comes from the Environmental Stewardship Fund (Growing Greener 1) and the Keystone Recreation, Park and Conservation Fund (Key 93). The grant is made as part of DCNR’s Conservation Landscape program, which is designed to drive strategic investment into unique, special landscapes around themes of conservation, sustainability, community revitalization and outdoor recreation. The South Mountain Conservation Landscape is one of seven Conservation Landscapes designated by DCNR across the state.

About the South Mountain Partnership
The South Mountain Partnership, one of seven Pennsylvania Conservation Landscapes, is managed as a public-private partnership by the ATC and DCNR. The Partnership is a unified group of citizens, businesses, nonprofits, academic institutions and local, state and federal government agencies and officials. Collectively, these partners strive to conserve landscape resources to enrich the quality of life and sense of place of the South Mountain region’s citizens and communities. For more information, please visit www.southmountainpartnership.org.

About the Appalachian Trail Conservancy
The ATC was founded in 1925 by volunteers and federal officials working to build a continuous footpath along the Appalachian Mountains. A unit of the National Park Service, the A.T. ranges from Maine to Georgia and is approximately 2,185 miles in length. It is the longest hiking-only footpath in the world. The mission of the ATC is to preserve and manage the Appalachian Trail – ensuring that its vast natural beauty and priceless cultural heritage can be shared and enjoyed today, tomorrow, and for centuries to come. For more information, please visit www.appalachiantrail.org.

Contact: Javier Folgar                                                                    
Appalachian Trail Conservancy
Tel: 304.535.2200 x117
Fax: 304.535.2667
Email: [email protected]
Facebook: www.facebook.com/ATHike
Web: www.appalachiantrail.org





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